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Accueil > À noter > Séminaires > Mercredi 25 juin 2014. Clayton ADAM (Paediatric Spine Research Group at Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia). A 14h, Salle de réunion de l’équipe GIBOC, Faculté des Sciences du Sport, Campus de Luminy (Marseille). ’Multiscale characterisation and modelling of the intervertebral disc : From whole joint biomechanics to the microscale.’

Mercredi 25 juin 2014. Clayton ADAM (Paediatric Spine Research Group at Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia). A 14h, Salle de réunion de l’équipe GIBOC, Faculté des Sciences du Sport, Campus de Luminy (Marseille). ’Multiscale characterisation and modelling of the intervertebral disc : From whole joint biomechanics to the microscale.’

Mise à jour : 6 novembre 2014

The intervertebral disc is the largest avascular structure in the human body, providing a unique combination of flexibility and motion resistance to the segmented vertebral column. The disc is subjected to large deformations during spinal motion, withstands transient loads of up to 9 times body weight during rigorous physical activity, and due to its lack of blood supply, its nutrient supply is provided by fluid-borne diffusion through the disc tissues from the
adjacent vertebral bodies. Degenerative Disc Disease (DDD) is a major source of pain, disability and lost work worldwide. Despite problems with adjacent level degeneration after surgery, the ’gold standard’ treatment for painful or unstable discs is still to rigidly fuse the joint, and Tissue Engineering (disc preserving) approaches to date have had little clinical impact due to the harsh biomechanical environment which is still inadequately understood. This presentation will describe the development of multi-scale, image-based computational biomechanics (CB) approaches to analyse the intervertebral disc. A key advantage of emerging CB approaches is the ability to predict physical quantities (such as flow and deformation) over a range of length and timescales in biological tissues, whereas such quantities are difficult or impossible to measure experimentally in living organisms. In the longer term, this approach promises new insights into tissue repair and remodelling in healthy discs, into tissue damage and cell death in degenerate discs, and in predicting disc response to emerging treatments such as annular repair and nucleus replacement.

(1) Little JP and Adam CJ, 2009. The effect of soft tissue properties on spinal flexibility in scoliosis : biomechanical simulation of fulcrum bending. Spine 34(2):E76-82.
(2) Little JP & Adam CJ, 2011. Patient-specific computational biomechanics for simulating adolescent scoliosis surgery : predicted vs clinical correction for a preliminary series of six patients. International Journal of Numerical Methods in Biomedical Engineering 27(3):347-56.
(3) Adam CJ, Askin GN, 2006. Automated measurement of vertebral rotation in idiopathic scoliosis. Spine 31(3):E80-E83.
(4) Mayo A, Labrom RD, Askin GN, Adam CJ, 2010. A biomechanical study of top screw pullout in anterior scoliosis correction constructs. Spine 35(13):E587-95.
(5) Shillington MR, Labrom R, Askin GN, Adam CJ, 2011. A biomechanical investigation of vertebral staples for fusionless scoliosis correction. Clinical Biomechanics 26:445-51.
(6) McDonald KA, Little JP, Pearcy MJ, Adam CJ, 2010. Development of a multi-scale finite element model of the osteoporotic lumbar vertebral body for the investigation of apparent level vertebra mechanics and micro-level trabecular mechanics. Medical Engineering and Physics 32:653-61.
(7) Adam CJ and Swain MV, 2011. The effect of friction on indenter force and pile-up in numerical simulations of bone nanoindentation. Journal of the Mechanical Behaviour of Biomedical Materials 4:1554-8.

Publications : http://eprints.qut.edu.au/view/pers...,_Clayton.html

Voir en ligne : Website : http://staff.qut.edu.au/st...

Post-scriptum :

Dr Clayton Adam is a visiting professor at Laboratoire de Biomécanique, Arts et Metiers ParisTech (ENSAM), and Associate Professor and Research Director of the Paediatric Spine Research Group at Queensland University of Technology in Brisbane, Australia. He has a PhD in computational mechanics from James Cook University in Townsville, Australia, and 15 years of research experience in Biomedical Engineering, with expertise in spine biomechanics. Key contributions include the development of a patient-specific finite element model for simulating thoracoscopic spinal deformity surgery (1, 2), development of image analysis techniques for automated measurement of spinal deformity (3), in vitro biomechanical studies of spinal implant constructs (4,5), multiscale modelling of osteoporotic vertebrae (6), and atomic force microscopy studies of bone nanoindentation in order to develop nanoscale elasto-plastic constitutive models (7).