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Accueil > À noter > Séminaires > Séminaire du jeudi 14 février 2013 présenté par Antoine MORICE (ISM, CNRS & Aix-Marseille Univ.) et Violaine SEVREZ (CRIS, Univ. de Lyon 1). A 14h, Salle des thèses, Faculté des Sciences du Sport, Campus de Luminy (Marseille). ’Perceptual and motor evaluation of motorcycle helmet ergonomics’.

Séminaire du jeudi 14 février 2013 présenté par Antoine MORICE (ISM, CNRS & Aix-Marseille Univ.) et Violaine SEVREZ (CRIS, Univ. de Lyon 1). A 14h, Salle des thèses, Faculté des Sciences du Sport, Campus de Luminy (Marseille). ’Perceptual and motor evaluation of motorcycle helmet ergonomics’.

Mise à jour : 7 octobre 2013

The design of motorcycle helmets is constrained by both perceptual and safety concerns. Problematically, vision and safety appear to be conflicting in term of helmet frontal aperture. Indeed, a large aperture is required for a large Field of View (FOV) while the aperture should on the contrary be as small as possible for the sake of helmet structural solidity. The reduction of the size of helmet aperture in favour of safety may have negative consequences in terms of both visual information and motor constraints. A limitation of the vertical FOV (FOVV ) may indeed partly occlude the road layout, therefore possibly masking near or far sources of visual information potentially involved in the control of steering (Salvucci & Gray, 2005). In order to compensate for the disruption of visual information, the motorcyclist may then have to perform repetitive vertical head movements or to hold the head in a stressful position, consequently putting extra stress onto its musculoskeletal-system (Thuresson et al. 2005). The present work thus aims at investigating the perceptual and motor consequences of the design of helmet frontal aperture in order to optimize it and thus : (i) preserve driving performance and (ii) avoid musculoskeletal disorders. As helmet weight and riding position may adds up to the informational and motor constraints imposed by the helmet aperture, we designed a virtual reality protocol to estimate securely and at low cost the combined effect of helmet aperture, riding posture and head inertia on both perceptual and biomechanical dependant variables. Preliminary results suggest that the perceptual and motor constraints induced by the helmet aperture, weight and the riding posture influence both facets of helmet ergonomic performance. First, decreasing FOVV lead drivers to slow down but also to experience difficulties in maintaining their position in the lane. Second, repeated top-down head movements performed to compensate for FOVV ’s reduction in picking-up near and far information induced a higher load for the musculoskeletal system, thus possibly leading to musculoskeletal disorder or discomfort if riding the motorcycle for a long time.

Post-scriptum :

Les résultats présentés ont été obtenus dans le cadre d’une action incitative financée par l’ISM pour l’année 2011-2012.