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Accueil > À noter > Séminaires > Mercredi 10 Juillet 2013. Richard FITZPATRICK (Neuroscience Research Australia and University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia). A 14h, Amphithéâtre de la Faculté des Sciences du Sport, Campus de Luminy (Marseille). ’On human balance and orientation’.

Mercredi 10 Juillet 2013. Richard FITZPATRICK (Neuroscience Research Australia and University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia). A 14h, Amphithéâtre de la Faculté des Sciences du Sport, Campus de Luminy (Marseille). ’On human balance and orientation’.

Mise à jour : 8 octobre 2013

Many sensory systems provide the brain with the information it needs for orientation, maintain balance and to make successful movements of the limbs. Sensations from joints muscle and skin, signals from the vestibular organs of the inner ear, vision and sound are merged together so automatically that we are hardly aware of it - until something goes wrong. One aim of our research is to understand how the brain combines these different senses to form a single representation of the body, and its orientation and how, when things go wrong, it leads to debilitating problems such as vertigo, motion sickness and falls. We will review some new insights on human balance and orientation through our latest experimental work on perception when standing, galvanic vestibular stimulation, and on stepping.

Voir en ligne : Richard Fitzpatrick is currently a guest professor at the Institute of Movement Sciences.

Post-scriptum :

Biosketch

Dr Fitzpatrick (BSc MBBS PhD MAcadWHUFC) undertook his initial training with Ian McCloskey and David Burke at the University of New South Wales. He has many research interests in the neuroscience of human sensation, posture balance and movement control, the integration of motor and cardiovascular responses. He applies a wide range of neurophysiological and psychophysical techniques to investigate fundamental human physiology and pathophysiology relevant to a wide range of clinical conditions. He serves on editorial boards including the Journal of Physiology and the Journal of Applied Physiology.